Myrtus communis L.
Kosher certified

Myrtle Essential oil Tunisia

Myrtus communis L.
Botanical family : Myrtaceae
Method of culture : Wildcrafted controlled
Part harvested : Leaves
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 8008-46-6
INCI : Myrtus communis oil


Herbaceous

Herbaceous
Cineolic

In the middle of the plant

Myrtle is a small, bushy shrub with lovely, pristine, and fragrant spring flowers. Sharing the same botanical family as the giant eucalyptus, clove tree, and even trees such as niaouli, tea tree, and cajeput, myrtle is the only European Myrtaceae representative. Highly regarded in days of old, myrtle was a sacred plant for the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and Hebrews and, being just as revered as laurel, myrtle branches were also braided into crowns to celebrate the triumphs of victorious Roman generals. The entire plant is aromatic and its leaves are distilled to produce an herbaceous, camphorated essential oil. The fragrance can be found in the famous “Eau d’Ange,” a hydrosol made from its leafy branches.

Myrtle was dedicated to Venus and therefore a symbol of love and passion. Cupid’s bow and arrows were said to be made of its wood. It was a feature of wedding ceremonies in Rome, as myrtle crowns were worn by the newlyweds. In Nordic countries, myrtle is also associated with nuptials, and is also the symbol of marital happiness among the Hebrews. In Greece, myrtle is a symbol of sexual potency. As is the case with mint, superstition has it that, when you pass a myrtle, you must pluck a sprig.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Hydrostillation
Appearance Amber yellow to orange liquid
Constituents Alpha-pinene (50-60%), cineole-1,8 (18-25%), myrtenyl acetate (


Advised uses : Aromatherapy, Perfumery, Cosmetic, Alimentary


Ranges

perfumery range

Cosmetic range