Liquidambar styraciflua L.
Kosher certified Albert Vieille production

Styrax Resinoid Honduras

Liquidambar styraciflua L.
Botanical family : Hamamelidaceae
Method of culture : Wildcrafted controlled
Part harvested : Gum
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 8024-01-9
INCI : Liquidambar styraciflua extract


Balsamic

Balsamic
Spicy

In the middle of the plant

Styrax is a tree belonging to the Liquidambar genus. Its name comes from the Latin liquidus and the Arabic ambar, meaning "liquid amber" in reference to the very fragrant gum it exudes when cut. Two varieties of styrax are used in perfumery: Asian styrax, or Liquidambar orientalis, and American styrax, or Liquidambar styraciflua, which we offer. This monumental tree grows naturally in dense tropical forests in the Olancho Mountains of Honduras. It is also found in Guatemala, Mexico, and El Salvador. Styrax is harvested from April to November, and only by the Pech tribe in Honduras. The collectors make cavity-shaped incisions in the trunk to initiate the flow and in which the precious amber liquid accumulates. A mature tree produces between six and eight kilograms of styrax resin. One month after the incision, the styrax is soaked up in cloths. It is then filtered to remove impurities before being turned into essential oil by steam distillation, and into resinoid by ethanol extraction. The distillation yield of 15-20% of purified resin is much lower than the extraction yield of around 60-75%. Its pleasant balsamic smell with a bitter almond note is complemented by a cinnamic quality that evokes cinnamon. With a very modern, plastic quality, styrax is characterized by its leathery note. Subtle notes of pinkish white flowers and fruit add an overall sweetness.

 In ancient Egypt – 3,000 B.C. – it seems the Egyptians used styrax resin to embalm bodies. Traces of styrax have also been detected in Incan tombs dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, due to the presence of cinnamic acid and styrene, characteristic molecules of resin. Styrax was widely used at one time in the Americas to treat lung infections and wounds. It was introduced into Europe by Cortés in the 15th century and imported in large quantities for its fragrance and medicinal qualities.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Ethanolic extraction
Appearance Yellowish brown to dark brown viscous liquid
Constituents Cinnamyl alcohol, phenylpropyl cinnamate, cinnamyl cinnamate


Advised uses : Aromatherapy, Perfumery, Cosmetic, Alimentary


Range

perfumery range