Centaurea cyanus L.
Kosher certified

Cornflower water 6% France

Centaurea cyanus L.
Botanical family : Asteraceae
Method of culture : Conventional
Part harvested : Flowers
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 84012-18-0
INCI : Centaurea cyanus flower water


Herbaceous

Herbaceous
Dry

In the middle of the plant

Cornflower is one of the most familiar wildflowers in the Western world. Native to Mediterranean regions, the plant spread across Europe via cereal crops. As a field-growing species, the plant’s seeds became “clandestine” travelers in bags of wheat and thus colonized new territories. Cornflower is an annual plant with slender stems bearing narrow, elongated leaves and pretty blue flowers tinged with purple. The flower heads are harvested during the flowering period in July to be distilled into floral water. Cornflower hydrosol, like that of May rose or witch hazel, is a noble product of distillation. This means that the plant material used for distillation is exclusively for making floral water. The hydrosol is not a byproduct of distillation, such as with the waters made from orange blossom, lavender, or Damask rose. Cornflower water has dry, herbaceous scent.

Cornflower water is renowned for its therapeutic properties, particularly as an eye treatment. Long in the past, it was said that cornflower was a remedy for blue eyes. This led to its being given the vivid French nickname Casse-lunettes, or “break glasses.” Also called bluebottle and cyani flower in English, the plant has more than 150 common names. Not only does the flower’s color inspire many popular names, it also serves as a basis for its scientific name. The species cyanus originates from the Greek word kyanos meaning “dark blue.” The botanical genus name Centaurea comes from the Greek kentauros, which means “centaur,” which would appear to refer to the centaur Chiron who used medicinal plants. Cornflower found its way into another tale in Greek mythology: Cyanus, the child poet who celebrated nature, was turned into a cornflower upon his death by the nymph Chloris (called Flora by the Romans). In Russia, a similar legend tells of a young man named Basil or Vasily who was changed into a cornflower by a lovesick nymph, so that he could not woo anyone else. The Russians therefore call the cornflower basilek.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Steam distillation of the dry material
Appearance Colourless liquid, slightly yellow and opalescent
Constituents Water and essential oil titration


Advised uses : Aromatherapy, Perfumery, Cosmetic, Alimentary


Ranges

Aromatherapy range

Cosmetic range