Thuja occidentalis L.
Kosher certified

Cedar leaves Essential oil France

Thuja occidentalis L.
Botanical family : Cupressaceae
Method of culture : Wildcrafted controlled
Part harvested : Leafy branches
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 8007-20-3
INCI : Thuya occidentalis leaf oil


Woody

Woody
Camphoraceous

In the middle of the plant

Canadian cedar is conifer native to the cold temperate regions of Asia and North America. It is called white cedar in Canada. It grows naturally in continental climates with harsh winters, such as in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. It has a tapered shape and may reach 15 meters in height. A member of the Cupressaceae family, cedar has leaves formed of overlapping scales, much like those of the cypress tree. These evergreen leaves range are yellow-green with a bluish underside, and some varieties have leaves that change color to gold or bronze. The young twigs are distilled to produce the cedar leaf essential oil, which has a woody, camphoraceous fragrance.

Cedar leaf essential oil should not be confused with cedar essential oil distilled from Juniperus virginiana (Red Cedar) or Cedrus atlantica (Atlas Cedar). Cedar was discovered in America by Captain Jacques Cartier during his second expedition to Canada in 1535. Well-known to the indigenous peoples, cedar twigs were used to make decoctions to treat illness. Cedar was the salvation of the Cartier expedition team, afflicted with scurvy and trapped in the unforgiving winter weather of Quebec. Back in France, the captain planted cedars at Notre Dame de Rocamadour, Our Lady of the Rock, as thanks for his having survived.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Hydrodistillation
Appearance Colourless to yellow limpid liquid
Constituents Alpha-thuyone, beta-thuyone, fenchone


Advised uses : Aromatherapy, Perfumery, Cosmetic, Alimentary