Cistus ladaniferus var beta maculatus Dun.
Kosher certified Albert Vieille production

Cistus Concrete Spain

Cistus ladaniferus var beta maculatus Dun.
Botanical family : Cistaceae
Method of culture : Wildcrafted controlled
Part harvested : Leafy twigs
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 8016-26-0
INCI : Cistus ladaniferus leaf/stem extract


Ambery

Ambery
Resinous

In the middle of the plant

In the Cistaceae family, there are many species of cistus. Cistus ladaniferus L. var. maculata Dunal is the cistus that has been used in perfumery for 3,000 years, treasured for its potent, amber-like, balsamic fragrance. Cistus ladaniferus can be distinguished from other cistus species by its large white flowers that bear deep burgundy spots at the base of the petals. In Andalusia, these purple blotches are called the “tears of Christ.” It is a perennial shrub growing wild throughout the Mediterranean. The young leafy twigs, with a high concentration of odorant molecules, are harvested in summer in our cistus fields in Almaden de la Plata near Seville, Spain. Harvesting is done manually using a sickle. The plant goes through various processing steps in our plant, resulting in a wide range of amber notes found across the product range of essential oil, concrete, cistus absolute, labdanum absolute, labdanum resinoid, and labdasur. The hexane extraction of young cistus branches produces cistus concrete with a yield of about 5% of the fresh plant. The concrete, a solid-textured substance, is used to prepare cistus absolute.

The ancient Greeks knew about gum from the Cistus creticus plant, a species related to Cistus labdaniferus, and understood how to collect it. Shepherds harvested the gum by combing their goats, whose coats had become laden with cistus gum as they crisscrossed the hillsides. Another technique was to beat the cistus plants with a leather strap, causing the very glutinous gum to accumulate on the strap, to be later gathered by scraping the strap with a knife. In those days, labdanum took the form of a cake, small balls, or twists. Today, cistus production take place largely in Spain, and the leafy branches are harvested using a sickle before being processed.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Extraction with solvents
Appearance Dark brown solid
Constituents Paraffin, labdanolic derivates


Advised uses : Perfumery, Cosmetic