Cistus ladaniferus var beta maculatus Dun.
Kosher certified Albert Vieille production

Labdanum Resinoid Spain

Cistus ladaniferus var beta maculatus Dun.
Botanical family : Cistaceae
Method of culture : Wildcrafted controlled
Part harvested : Leafy branches
Harvest period :
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

CAS TSCA : 8016-26-0


Ambery

Ambery
Leathery

In the middle of the plant

Used in perfumery for over 3,000 years, Cistus labdaniferus var maculata still is an essential ingredient in perfume-making. This remarkable Mediterranean shrub perfumes the air of our scrublands with a powerful amber-like scent. The only plant to have amber notes similar to those of ambergris, it is also known as “vegetable ambergris.” Spain is where the bulk of world production takes place of cistus-derived products: cistus essential oil, cistus concrete, cistus absolute, labdanum resinoid, and labdanum absolute. This follows naturally from the shrub’s abundantly wild growth in Spain. The whole plant, particularly the leaves, secretes a very fragrant gum – labdanum –that protects it from southern Spain’s extremely hot summers. The shrub’s leafy twigs are harvested in July-August in our cistus fields in Almaden de la Plata near Seville, Spain. To recover the labdanum, the twigs are plunged into hot, carbonated water for a few minutes, then removed from the tank (they will be used as fuel). Adding acid makes it possible to obtain the “raw” gum, which still contains about 35% water. It will then be dewatered and dried for a final moisture content of less than 10%. Labdanum resinoid is obtained by ethanolic extraction of the gum, followed by concentration. The yield is about 65% of the dry gum.

In ancient times, labdanum gum from Cistus creticus, a close relative of the species Cistus labdaniferus – the only one used today – was collected in Crete in two ways: The gum could be harvested by combing the coats of goats that grazed in the cistus-covered hillsides; or by thrashing the branches of the cistus plants with a leather strap and then scraping that strap with a knife. Cistus’ glutinous properties made these forms of harvesting possible. Today, most cistus production takes place in Spain, where the leafy branches are collected using a sickle before being processed.

Your technical documents

Data sheet Security sheet Kosher
GHS CLP GHS CLP K

Specifications

Method for obtaining Ethanolic extraction
Appearance Dark brown to orange-brown solid
Constituents Labdane diterpenes (labdanoic acids and derivates)


Advised uses : Aromatherapy, Perfumery, Cosmetic, Alimentary