Orange blossom Spain

Absolute

Citrus aurantium ssp amara

F&F

General data

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Technical sheets

Safety sheets


Kosher

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Product details

Our added value

Based on an exclusive partnership engaging both parts on quantity and quality and ensuring fair price for the collectors, we have worked with local producers with the aim to secure the historical bitter orange tree supply chain from Seville.

Farming without pesticides in a traditional orchard, near the Seville harbour.

Traceable at source: the flowers come from one orchard and are processed, from the fresh flowers to the absolute, in our facilities near Seville.

Orange blossom can be associated with many materials, in many types of perfumes, including eaux de Cologne, chypre or amber accords, flower bouquets and oriental fragrances.

It is a perfect complement to citrus notes, acts as a natural fixative and can also be used as a modifier in chypre or woody accords through its animal notes.
Orange blossom absolute is also used in floral fragrances or to accentuate the fruity notes of apricot.

Seville is the first producer of bitter oranges worldwide and that is why this fruit was dubbed as the “Seville orange” used mostly to make marmalade. In the 20th century, with the demographic growth of the city, the cultivation of bitter orange trees has gradually disappeared, being reduced to small family gardens and ornamental plant nurseries. Orchards, which were generally located near cities, disappeared under the pressure of building construction.

In Spain the harvest takes place in early spring, when the warmth replaces the coldness of winter. Like for the olive trees, the bitter orange blossoms are harvested using a tractor that vibrates the trunks. The flowers fall down over a net at the bottom of the trees under an ecstatic olfactory rain. The collectors then manually remove most of the branches and leaves and finish sorting the flowers from the leaves and debris using a sieve.
The flowers must be processed quickly to prevent oxidization from the sun’s rays. The flowers are therefore rapidly transported in jute bags to our facilities in Spain to be transformed first into concrete and then into absolute.

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